Tag Archives: front door

Eight Easily-Avoidable Home Staging Mistakes

I think most home sellers agree that they can’t afford to lose potential buyers in this competitive real estate market.  So, if you’re a home seller, are you ready to do whatever it takes to ensure that your home appeals to the most people possible? Remember, buyers automatically looking for reasons not to buy your home, so it’s in your best interest to avoid giving them reasons!  The quicker your home sells, the more money you can put in your pocket.

Common Mistakes You Can Avoid When Staging Your Home

1.  Not keeping the porch area around the front door clean, colorful and uplifting.  This means you’ve got to sweep debris daily.  Remove any flowerpots that don’t have vibrant flowers or plants in them.  And get a new colorful (but not personal!) heavy-weight front door mat.  A buyer’s initial impression starts before they even enter your home.

 2.  Ensuring that there aren’t any missing lightbulbs in light fixtures and that all bulb work.  Even one burnt out-bulb can signal, in a buyer’s mind, the idea of the home needing repairs. 

 3.  Not removing old hangers or other miscellaneous items from closets.  These personal items negate a buyer’s important need to be able to imagine themselves in the home.

 4.  Not paying attention to odors in every room.  Your home shouldn’t have any odor unless it’s a light scent of something neutral.  My personal favorites are baking pastry dough or cinnamon.  Even if you’ve moved the kitty litter into a discrete corner of a guest bathroom, you’ve got to make sure that there is no odor associated with it when people enter the bathroom.  Any negative odor will add to a buyer’s list of negatives regarding your home and will make it harder to sell.  Perhaps a buyer with cats will look past the odor, but do you really want to take that chance?

 5.  Replacing all old and tired-looking tissue boxes with new, colorful boxes.  There’s a wide range of wonderful options that can add life and energy to a room.

 6.  Not replacing almost-empty toilet tissue rolls and paper towel rolls before a showing.  Having full, fresh rolls of paper products gives buyers a feel of abundance and not depletion. 

 7.  Not removing books or publications that can evoke negative emotions in buyers.  Although (theoretically) buyers are supposed to over-look a seller’s personal items, it’s could be hard for some people to look past the National Rifle Association Magazine they saw on your coffee table or the book  entitled “A hundred reasons that Republicans are better than Democrats” on your bookshelf.

8.  Not removing and storing all stuffed animal heads, stuffed birds, animal skulls, swords, guns, and the like.  Oftentimes, I’ve walked into a well-appointed home and found a prominent display of hunting “treasures” throughout the home.  These may cause happy energy in the home owner but lots of home buyers may have a negative opinion of such a display.

Buying a Home? Look for these Feng Shui Features.

When you’re in the market for a new a home your biggest priorities are usually price and location.  Next, the floor plan of the home and the feeling you get when you walk in will be deciding factors.  Have you ever experienced that feeling of  “ahhh!” when you enter a space?  It’s an intrinsic feeling you get when an environment feels nurturing.  It’s a great indicator that the house has good Feng Shui.    

Here are six features to look for when you’re in the market for a new home that will create good Feng Shui:

1.  Where is the home located in relation to the street? Avoid buying a home on a T-junction.  When a home is on a T-junction it gets bombarded with traffic energy coming towards it.  The result can be increased arguments and conflict at home.  If the home sits back a good distance from the street or if there is landscaping between the street and the home it alleviates the negative effects.

2.  Does the front door face the street?  Look for a home a with front door facing forward, not to the side, and which isn’t blocked.  The  front door is important in Feng Shui because it is the primary pathway for energy.   A front door which enjoys a clear pathway can receive energy- also referred to as “qi” – and the home will be healthier.  Avoid having large trees directly in front of the door which block qi.

3.  Is the floor plan practical and functional? Practicality almost always indicates good Feng Shui.  Some minor oddities are endearing, but things that make you scratch your head and say “what were they thinking?” are almost always a sign of bad Feng Shui.  Trust your instinct.  If it’s impractical and feels awkward to you it can likely cause problems in your home due to unbalanced energy.

4.  Does the home have good flow?  Open floor plans are preferable because they allow  qi within your home to circulate.  If the floor plan is compartmentalized ensure that rooms have windows so you create good qi pathways.

5.  Do you feel comfortable with the way the home sits on the lot?  Having a steep hill six feet behind you can cause you to feel claustrophobic.  Conversly, if the home sits on top of a hill you may feel exposed and unsupported.  It’s best to look for a flat lot that comfortably fits the home.   When home is grounded and securely placed on the lot, you’ll feel the same. 

6.  What type of driveway does the home have?  Is it circular?  Don’t buy a home with a circular driveway unless you plan infrequent use.  If you use a circular driveway often, the coming and going of the vehicles create a disturbance of energy in the front of your home which can cause conflict inside your  home.

For Good Feng Shui take a look at these Areas in Your Home First.

The art and science of Feng Shui provides guidelines for assessing how healthy the energy (or “qi”) is in your environment.  Certain areas of your home have a bigger influence than others in determining whether or not you have good Feng Shui.  When your home has good Feng Shui, it supports your health, wealth, and relationships.  When it doesn’t, you may experience struggles or what’s commonly referred to as “bad luck.” Of course your home is the sum of its parts and every area has some impact — even small areas like the top shelf of your closet!

First – The Front Door  Why?  In Feng Shui, qi is the life force that fills your home.  All exterior doors and windows are qi mouths, allowing energy into your home.  The front door is the most important qi mouth and the direction your door faces determines the quality of qi your home receives. 

Recommendations

  1. The door is best placed facing forward and not sideways.  It can easily receive qi when facing forward. A front door facing sideways is kind of like having your face on sideways  – it’s awkward and strained.
  2. A winding pathway leading up to the door rather than a straight path is preferable.  Winding paths allow qi to meander to the door rather than rush toward it.  If you’ve got a long, straight path you can place potted plants or bushes alongside of it to help slow down the qi.
  3. If the direction of traffic flows towards you, a fence or landscaping can prevent qi from rushing toward your front door.  When qi rushes at your door it can cause conflict in your home.
  4. Keep the front porch free of debris and in good condition.

Second – The Master Bedroom Why?  When you’re sleeping, you’re less guarded and more susceptible to qi forces in the room.  For good health, it’s important to ensure that your bedroom is healthy.

Recommendations

  1. Place your bed against a solid wall.  If you can’t do this because of windows, if you have a solid headboard it’ll help guard you from the energy coming in from the windows and you’ll sleep better.
  2. Don’t place your bed on the same wall as a toilet or in line with a toilet.  
  3. Place your bed flush against a wall rather than placing it diagonally.  If the floor plan doesn’t allow this, put a wall screen behind you to give you support.
  4. Place your bed facing the bedroom door if practical.
  5. If your bed is in line with a door such as the bedroom door or bathroom door, keep the door closed when you want to relax so you’re not hit with qi.
  6. Avoid placing sharp corners or objects pointing toward your bed.
  7. Place a nightstand on each side of your bed.  (They don’t have to match).
  8. If your bed doesn’t have a footboard, place a bench at the foot of your bed. 

 

Third – The Foyer  Why?  This is generally where qi first enters your home.  The foyer sets the tone for the rest of your home. 

Recommendations

  1. If your front door opens directly to a living area, create a virtual-foyer by using an area rug (consider a circular one), and a console or buffet table next to the door.   The purpose is to slow down qi from rushing into your space.
  2. Avoid clutter.  It’s best not to keep your shoes by the front door but if you do, ensure that they’re tastefully organized and not in obvious view.
  3. Be mindful of the artwork you see upon entering and ensure it’s something that lifts your spirits.
  4. Generally, a mirror is appropriate in this area.
  5. Ensure there’s abundant lighting.

The Five Best Feng Shui Tips Ever

Feng Shui is about balance and flow in an environment.  Balance refers to balancing your environment using furniture, color, lighting, and accessories.  Flow means energy flow – allowing energy to flow easily throughout your environment like a gentle waterway.  Having too much stuff in your environment or blocking energy flow can make you feel blocked in your life.  As a certified Feng Shui consultant, I ensure that my clients follow these basic Feng Shui principles before we do anything else.

 1. Your front door is considered the mouth of your home and a focal point.  Keep your front door clean and keep the front porch free of clutter.  Replace your door mat if it is worn out. Thick door mats with vibrant designs or colors add soul and uplift your energy. Place potted flowers or greenery on each side of the front door to create an inviting feeling.

 2.  Clear your clutter.  It not only gives you an immediate energy boost, but it alleviates stagnation in your life.  Anywhere that clutter accumulates over a period of time results in causing you to feel stuck – professionally, emotionally, or financially.  Keep your closets organized and discard things that you don’t need or haven’t used in a couple years or more.

 3.  Allow fresh air to circulate throughout your home when weather permits. Turn on fans occasionally to circulate air.  Don’t let air stagnate.  The very best Feng Shui tip is simply accomplished by allowing energy to circulate.  Open floor plans allow for this easier than compartmentalized plans. Also – dust, sweep, vacuüm, and clean your home regularly.

 4.  To add balance and warmth to dark rooms use vibrant fire colors in pillows, artwork, area rugs, and accessories.  Fire colors are red, gold, orange, and yellow, and will energize your space.  Dark areas are perfect areas to put mirrors to reflect light and create energy.

 5.  Remove all furniture, artwork, or accessories that you don’t love, or at least like a lot.  Just because it is a family heirloom, give yourself permission to give it away or “store” it if it doesn’t make you smile!

Five Simple Feng Shui Fixes

If you’re familiar with Feng Shui, it may seem that there are a lot of “no-no’s.”  If you found that your home has several Feng Shui issues, rest assured, there are always ways to mitigate a problem. Feng Shui is really quite flexible, and every situation is different because every home is different.  And if you find that you’ve got a Feng Shui issue but you’re not experiencing difficulty in your life, then don’t worry about creating a fix.  (If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!)

Here are five common Feng Shui Rules and suggestions for remedying the problem.

Rule 1 – A stairway shouldn’t face the front door.

This is a common problem and can drain your finances because energy can rush out the front door.  The solution? Simply don’t keep the front door open very much – use another door more often if possible.  You can place a mirror on the wall in the stairway facing upstairs to help slow the energy.  Also, place an entry rug with warm colors in it by the front door to help gather energy.

Rule 2 – The front door shouldn’t be in alignment with the back door.  This can be harmful to finances. If this is true in your home, simply don’t keep both doors open at the same time.  Also, you may put a buffer between the doors with furniture or by hanging drapes or a shade on the back door.

Rule 3 – Don’t position your bed in front of the bedroom door.

This is referred to as the “corpse position” and sounds scary doesn’t it? This rule is derived from the way corpses were carried out of a room in ancient times – feet first, towards the door.  Truth is, when the bed is in front of any door and the door is open, the rushing energy will hit you as you’re in bed and can cause sleep disturbances.  If this is unavoidable due to the size of the room, simply keep the door closed when you’re in bed to solve the problem.

Rule 4 – Don’t sit with your back to the door. 

Besides being conditioned in our reptilian brain to ensure safety from enemies it’s best to place your desk against a wall so that you sit facing outwards. Sitting with a wall behind you supports you and enables to relax.  However, because of computer wiring and the shape of a room, it’s not always possible to sit with your back to the wall.  If this is true for you, simply affix a small mirror to your computer screen so you can see who is coming in the room.

Rule 5 – Don’t sit or sleep under exposed beams in the ceiling. 

Exposed beams can cause an uneven distribution of energy which can hinder relaxation.  If you’ve got beams in the ceiling, but don’t have trouble sleeping, then don’t worry about trying to solve this problem.  If you feel uncomfortable or unable to relax, you can drape material over the beams or you can paint them the same color as the ceiling to lessen the energy movement.

Buying a New Home? Ten Feng Shui Guidelines to help to choose a great home.

crowncrest buyer1.    Look for the surrounding area to give you the “armchair” form. Your home should feel like it is sitting nestled in the seat of a nice comfy armchair with support in the back, strong arms on each side, and a level seat, with the area in front open and unobstructed.

2.     The house should not be located too high above the street or too low below the street.

3.    Streets that have light traffic which moves slowly are preferable to high traffic areas.  And look for gently winding streets to bring energy to you easier than straight streets do.

4.     It is preferable not to have a house on a  “T” junction.

5.    The master bedroom is best located in the back of the house and on the ground floor.

 6.    The house will be more likely to enjoy prosperity if it has an open floor plan which allows plenty of area for circulation.

 7.    To avoid conflict between parents and children, it is best to avoid having their respective bedroom doors facing each other.

8.     The house will bring more joy if it is light and bright with plenty of windows.

 9.    It is better for prosperity not to have a staircase directly facing the front door.

 10.  A curved walkway to the front door rather than a straight path is desirable.  Avoid homes with trees blocking the front door.

Feng Shui 101 – Let’s Start with the Front of your Home.

10 ways - Front Door

Energy flow to your front door is important.

Did you know that both interior and exterior features of your home affect your health, wealth, and relationships?  The lot your house is built on, the direction your front door faces, and neighboring homes and streets all have an influence on your life.  Let’s start with the front of your home, the side that’s facing the street.

Feng Shui systems are complex, but they’re also logical and practical.  In Feng Shui, it’s best to have the front door of your home facing the street rather than sideways.  The front door then is able to capture energy flow in front of your home easier than if it were turned to the side.  Feng Shui is all about good energy flow.  Think of the front of your home as being your face.  You don’t want to walk around with your head turned to one side – it’s not natural.  The same is true for a side-facing front door.

And if your front door faces the side, don’t worry, you don’t have to move, just ensure that shrubs and bushes in front of the door are short and allow energy to flow.   Don’t block the front door of your home, wherever it’s located, with large bushes, trees, and “stuff” which prevent it from receiving energy.  Think energy flow. Continue reading