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For Good Feng Shui take a look at these Areas in Your Home First.

The art and science of Feng Shui provides guidelines for assessing how healthy the energy (or “qi”) is in your environment.  Certain areas of your home have a bigger influence than others in determining whether or not you have good Feng Shui.  When your home has good Feng Shui, it supports your health, wealth, and relationships.  When it doesn’t, you may experience struggles or what’s commonly referred to as “bad luck.” Of course your home is the sum of its parts and every area has some impact — even small areas like the top shelf of your closet!

First – The Front Door  Why?  In Feng Shui, qi is the life force that fills your home.  All exterior doors and windows are qi mouths, allowing energy into your home.  The front door is the most important qi mouth and the direction your door faces determines the quality of qi your home receives. 

Recommendations

  1. The door is best placed facing forward and not sideways.  It can easily receive qi when facing forward. A front door facing sideways is kind of like having your face on sideways  – it’s awkward and strained.
  2. A winding pathway leading up to the door rather than a straight path is preferable.  Winding paths allow qi to meander to the door rather than rush toward it.  If you’ve got a long, straight path you can place potted plants or bushes alongside of it to help slow down the qi.
  3. If the direction of traffic flows towards you, a fence or landscaping can prevent qi from rushing toward your front door.  When qi rushes at your door it can cause conflict in your home.
  4. Keep the front porch free of debris and in good condition.

Second – The Master Bedroom Why?  When you’re sleeping, you’re less guarded and more susceptible to qi forces in the room.  For good health, it’s important to ensure that your bedroom is healthy.

Recommendations

  1. Place your bed against a solid wall.  If you can’t do this because of windows, if you have a solid headboard it’ll help guard you from the energy coming in from the windows and you’ll sleep better.
  2. Don’t place your bed on the same wall as a toilet or in line with a toilet.  
  3. Place your bed flush against a wall rather than placing it diagonally.  If the floor plan doesn’t allow this, put a wall screen behind you to give you support.
  4. Place your bed facing the bedroom door if practical.
  5. If your bed is in line with a door such as the bedroom door or bathroom door, keep the door closed when you want to relax so you’re not hit with qi.
  6. Avoid placing sharp corners or objects pointing toward your bed.
  7. Place a nightstand on each side of your bed.  (They don’t have to match).
  8. If your bed doesn’t have a footboard, place a bench at the foot of your bed. 

 

Third – The Foyer  Why?  This is generally where qi first enters your home.  The foyer sets the tone for the rest of your home. 

Recommendations

  1. If your front door opens directly to a living area, create a virtual-foyer by using an area rug (consider a circular one), and a console or buffet table next to the door.   The purpose is to slow down qi from rushing into your space.
  2. Avoid clutter.  It’s best not to keep your shoes by the front door but if you do, ensure that they’re tastefully organized and not in obvious view.
  3. Be mindful of the artwork you see upon entering and ensure it’s something that lifts your spirits.
  4. Generally, a mirror is appropriate in this area.
  5. Ensure there’s abundant lighting.
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Five Affordable Feng Shui Fixes For Decorating Dilemmas

Applying practical principles of Feng Shui can solve common decorating dilemmas.  Any of these principles can be applied in any room.

1-  If you don’t have a foyer or if you have a large room needing several different conversation areas you can create the illusion of a separate room by placing an area rug in the center of the space, coordinating with the color palette in the room.  For example, to create the feeling of a foyer place a circular area rug in front of the front door.  You can use area rugs wherever you want to delineate a space or create a conversation area.  Circular rugs are particularly good for pulling together a space.

2-  To complete or find inspiration for decorating a room, look for artwork that speaks to you.  Artwork  gives a room a finished feel and creates coziness as well as visual appeal.  I like to hang pictures so that the middle of the piece is one or two inches above eye level.

3-  Dark areas?  You can add balance and movement with mirrors, artwork containing fire colors (red, orange, pink, and purple) and circular or wavy objects which create movement.  If you have a corner that feels “dead” revitalize it with “up lighting” that’s placed on the floor, a decorative floor screen, or a standing mirror.

4- Does a room feel stark or sterile? “Cozify” it by adding soft drapes or roman shades, using earth and fire colors (brown, yellow, beige, red, and orange), and adding area rugs and soft fabrics such as cozy throw-pillows.

5-  If you don’t have a wall where you need one, you can invent one by placing a console behind a couch, using a decorative floor screen to separate areas, using bookshelves open on both sides, or drapes hung on side mounted retractable rods.  Floor screens also work well in corners to soften the area and create energy.

Easy Feng Shui Design Tips for a Small Space

In small environments use color and furniture arrangement to keep the space open and energy flowing.   Using the same colors throughout, but in different shades you can create a harmonious space with great Feng Shui.  Using the tips below will help your space feel open and in balance.

1- Think of the whole space as your palette rather than room by room.  Use one neutral color thoroughout the space and add color with accessories.  I recommend Benjamin Moore’s Barely Beige as a great neutral palette for walls.

2- Each room should relate to each other.  Use the same two or three accent colors in each room. Base your accent colors on one pair of complimentay colors.  Here’s an example:  brown, beige, red, and green.  You can slightly use different shades of these colors in different rooms and throw in another color in a room if you want, keeping the same palette and just adding to it.

Complimentary colors are:

 Red & Green  /  Yellow & Purple  /  Blue & Orange

3- Neutral-colored furniture is best for small spaces.  Add vibrancy in a room by using one piece of furniture with color.  For example, if your palette is beige, brown, blue and orange, a good addition to the décor could be a blue chair or an animal-print ottoman.

4- Mirrors are a great way to open up the space.  They are particularly beneficial placed on walls opposite windows so they can reflect the outside.

5- Use size-appropriate furniture for a small space.  Big, bulky, and heavy furniture is inappropriate.  Use lightweight, clean lines, and multifunctional pieces.  To see how a piece of furniture fits in the room before you buy it, use masking tape to outline the furniture on the floor.

6- Add coziness with soft drapery panels, pillows on couches, throw blankets and small area rugs.

7- If you don’t have a foyer by your front door create one by placing a rectangular or circular area rug in front of the door and a console table on the wall closest to the front door with a square or rectangular-shaped piece of art above it.  (A mirror would work well too).

Feng Shui 101 – Find the Foyer

Have you ever had the experience of walking into a house through a front door that opens directly into a living or dining room?  Did it feel unnatural or awkward to you?  Would you feel more comfortable entering a restaurant with a hostess area rather than walking directly into the dining room?     

Having a front door directly opening into a home (or restaurant) contradicts the principles of Feng Shui. Why?  Because energy (“chi”) flows into a house through the front door and it’s best not to have it rushing in,  it’s best to gather it in a foyer, then let it gently flow into the rest of the house.  When guests enter and depart, doesn’t it inherently feel better to have a foyer in which you can greet them and then send them off?   As you receive guests through the front door, you also receive chi.  Even though you can’t see chi you can feel it.  Thinking of chi as a flowing current may help you see that a gradual flow is more natural than a rushing current.

“Comfort or discomfort is an intuitive reaction to energy that feels wrong.  It is bad Feng Shui.”

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